Beware the Crooked Man

John Connolly: The Book of Lost Things
Illustrated by Anne M Anderson
Hodder 2017 (2006)

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile.
He found a crooked sixpence upon a crooked stile.
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

What attracted me about The Book of Lost Things was, first, the title with its intimation of mystery and, second, the cover illustration by Robert Ryan with its suggestion of the sinister wild wood of the fairytale imagination. Then, as I read it, it morphed. At times it felt like a scrapbook filled with pictures, cuttings and ephemera saved as souvenirs. Occasionally it reminded me of a Commonplace Book, those more literary scrapbooks whose owners copy passages that catch their eye, aphorisms, and quotes, or of a jotter in which random thoughts are noted down in the hopes that they will make sense at some future point.

So what is it essentially? It is a novel about folktales and fairytales, especially the latter with their implicit morals and rules for living an honest life. It’s also a story about living in a fictional dream-like world in real time which somehow becomes real. And it’s a narrative about how living in a fairytale world can reveal secrets and the difference between truth and lies.

Continue reading “Beware the Crooked Man”

Filled with the marvellous

Arthur Rackham: illustration for Jack the Giant Killer
Arthur Rackham: illustration for Jack the Giant Killer

Fairy tales was the next genre to be discussed in the creative writing class, though I have to say that, following the precedent of ‘folktale’, I prefer the single-word form fairytale since fairies aren’t always the litmus test for this category. As usual this post will incorporate notes from the class with comments of my own.

Stith Thompson (editor of the Aarne–Thompson tale type index) suggested in The Folktale (1977) that fairytales are “of some length involving a succession of motifs or episodes”. Further defining features include “an unreal world without definite locality or definite characters and […] filled with the marvellous”. In this Never Never Land “humble heroes kill adversaries, succeed to kingdoms and marry princesses”.

So much for the traditional fairytale: does that still hold true for its modern descendants?
Continue reading “Filled with the marvellous”

Interview with a storyteller

storyteller

Cheryl Mahoney’s pen portrait tells us she is a fantasy writer “living in California and dreaming of fairylands”. Her two published novels are in the Grimm tradition, but with a modern twist. The Wanderers was published in 2013 and concerns a talking cat, a witch’s daughter and a wandering adventurer who wants to live by the rules that govern the fairytale world, until it starts to go horribly wrong. The Storyteller and Her Sisters was published recently and is a story about twelve trapped princesses who must dance every night with twelve princes; but they are not the passive victims that the Grimm story would have us believe. Both titles are available in ebook and paperback format, with the second also on Kindle.

Besides novels, she also writes an excellent book review blog, Tales of the Marvelous, a title inspired by L Frank Baum’s confession “”Since I can remember, my eyes have always grown big at tales of the marvelous.” Here you can read discussions on books in a number of genres, from fantasy to detective, and from SF to historical fiction. I recently asked her about her approach to her own writing. Continue reading “Interview with a storyteller”

Mundane to magical

grimm

Polly Shulman The Grimm Legacy Oxford University Press 2012 (2010)

It’s an unprepossessing nameplate: The New York Circulating Material Repository. Elizabeth Rew is hoping her new job will involve working with books, but it turns out to be more than that, “like a circulating book library with far more varied collections”. She’s given a brief rundown on its history — informative but not very enlightening, she thinks — on the day she starts as a lowly-paid ‘page’, assisting the librarians with day-to-day tasks:

We’ve existed in one form or another since 1745, when three clock makers began sharing some of their more specialized tools. That collection became the core of the repository in 1837, when a group of amateur astronomers pooled their resources and opened shop. Our first home was on St John’s Park, near Greenwich Street, but we moved uptown to East Twenty-fourth Street in 1852 and to our current location in 1921…

Elizabeth is starting to understand this is no ordinary lending and reference collection. Furthermore, she begins to find herself fascinated by a mysterious restricted section. And then situations and events commence moving away from the mundane. Towards the magical.

Continue reading “Mundane to magical”

Grimm by name, grim by nature

forest
A Preseli conifer plantation, a stand-in for Teutonic forests

Cornelia Funke Fearless Chicken House 2013

The second in Cornelia Funke’s Mirrorworld series has been blessed with an authentic-looking late 19th- or early 20th-century map by Raul Garcia, which greatly helps with orientation though, in keeping with the nightmarish nature of the books, its seeming accuracy can be deceiving. In Reckless, Jacob managed to save his brother Will from being totally transformed into a stone being or Goyl (a name derived, no doubt, from ‘gargoyle’); this was, however, achieved at great cost to Jacob himself, who appears thereby to have condemned himself to a lingering death, magically-induced, as a result of his self-sacrifice.

Unless of course he can find a key talisman: Continue reading “Grimm by name, grim by nature”

Darkly imagined universe

looking-glass

Cornelia Funke Reckless Chicken House 2011

Through the Looking-Glass
the Brothers Grimm live again,
but a life more weird

Best known for their collection of fairy tales, more so than for their pioneering philological researches, Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm (their surname translates as ‘fierce’) are the inspiration for the main characters in Cornelia Funke’s novel. Jacob and Will Reckless’ surname — echoing the Grimms’ — means ‘headstrong’, ‘rash’ as well as being a bona fide English surname. When the historic Jakob Grimm was 11 their father died, much as, when Jacob is around the same age, the fictional brothers’ father disappears. Later, the two real-life brothers trained in law before getting deeply involved in researching folklore and folk-customs, and the older Jacob moved in with Wilhelm and his new bride; in Reckless, meanwhile, the unattached young adult Jacob finds himself in an alternative fairytale world joined by brother Will and his girlfriend Clara against his wishes. It is clear that Funke has determinedly drawn on the lives of the Brothers Grimm to structure her tale (the first of many, we are to presume) of magic and fairies set in archetypal Teutonic black forests and Central European cities.

What other influences can be seen in this novel? Continue reading “Darkly imagined universe”