Good book nook look

windowseat
Window seat with a view, the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons

It’s been half a year, but worth it. Builders have almost, but not quite, gutted the house. In no particular order roofs have been renewed, ceilings repaired, the cellar made safe, façades re-rendered, replacement doors fitted, rotten windows replaced, new floors laid and new rooms created. Dust somehow magically re-appears and is not-so-magically removed, over and over again. I’m sure you’re all familiar with this, whether to a greater or lesser extent.

And now the good news: the builders have left the building. Barring odd hiccups the house is now ours. ‘Normal’ life can slowly be resumed. And I can start to catch up with what I’ve been missing in the blogosphere and to reduce the until now neglected pile of bedside books.

So, here’s a glimpse of what every bibliophile needs: a nook in which to curl up with a good book, with a view to periodically look out at. Plus, a promise to speedily renew acquaintances. (And more infinitives to casually split.)

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11 thoughts on “Good book nook look

  1. I would end up just looking at the view and the hundreds of little things that catch the eye. And you get the church spire….wonderful view, lucky you 🙂

    1. I agree, but there’s always a book to look at when one tires of the changing skyscape, the cloud shadows chasing each other over the hillsides, the sparkle of the river in the valley below… It’s a bore but someone has to do it!

  2. I’m looking forward to sharing the views and books vicariously. And split away — the natural rhythm of English encourages it (and few people these days, besides unreconstructed editors and people over the age of 60, know what an infinitive is anyway).

  3. I certainly do vicarious, Lizzie!

    Splits? I’m always cognisant of the fact that that ‘rule’ was invented by grammarians who thought that English should follow good Latin practice, though heaven knows the infinitive of the ancients (let alone modern Romance languages) never had two elements to split in the first place.

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